Worsted-Spun Yarns

All of my yarns are made from the fine and soft wool of purebred Cormo sheep.
The yarn colors are the actual colors of the fleeces of the sheep (white, black, and gray), and blends of those colors.
White Cormo fleeces are a bright white, not a cream color.
Black and gray fleeces become brown-tipped after exposure to the sun; so the more dark wool in a blend, the more brown the color.
My light grays are warm grays; my medium grays are brownish grays; my dark grays are very brownish grays; my darkest shade is chocolate brown.

In the worsted spinning system, wool (or other fiber) is carded, combed, and drafted before being spun into yarn.
As the wool is combed and drafted, the shorter fibers are removed, and the remaining longer fibers are brought into alignment with each other.
Worsted-spun yarns are dense and strong. Because of the density, a typical worsted yarn is thinner than a typical woolen yarn of the same ypp.

Spun In Maine

All of my Maine-spun yarns — unlike typical worsted-spun yarns — are low-twist, very soft, a little fuzzy, and apt to pill to some degree.

Original Yarns

Adult / Lamb Yarns

Irregular Yarns

The Maine-spun irregular yarns are low twist and very soft.
These yarns will pill. All have a large number of fiber nepps, and some skeins have one or more large slubs.
Prices have been reduced.

SPUN IN PENNSYLVANIA

Higher-twist (original) yarns

My higher-twist Pennsylvania-spun yarns have substantial weight, nice drape, a smooth feel, and good strength and durability.
The Aran and bulky weights were slightly over-twisted during plying.
So fabrics knit with these yarns in stockinette tend to bias a little; fabrics knit in balanced stitches like garter, moss, etc. do not bias.

Lower-twist irregular yarns

My lower-twist Pennsylvania-spun yarns are very soft, are much more uneven than typical worsted-spun, and have fiber nepps and slubs.
Prices have been reduced.